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Portland OR

Integrating psychotherapy, medication management, body work & mindfulness for an encompassing and empowering approach to healing.

Tag: hypervigilance

Workshop for Trauma Survivors

Coming Soon….Honoring your Internal Warriors: Preparing for Trauma Work from an Internal Family Systems Perspective.”

Athena Phillips, LCSW will be offering a workshop for trauma survivors who are in the early stages of recovery. The decision to engage in therapy is in itself a tough decision and in my opinion, courageous. Revisiting painful memories is counter-intuitive~avoidance is probably more natural. In order to alleviate the influence trauma can have over our lives, we need to go against what our thoughts might be telling us to do (avoid, get away from, never go back). Typically it’s our bodies that won’t allow us to leave trauma behind until we have successfully processed and made some meaning of profound experiences. The conflict between our thoughts that tell us to forget about it or get over it and our body’s unrelenting reminders that we need to tend to our past creates significant internal tension.

The beginning of trauma work should be housed in establishing safety with the therapist as well as trust in ourselves in being able to handle the material we intend to revisit within the therapeutic context. Setting this intention naturally activates our protective mechanisms; the parts of ourselves that understandably have some concern about looking at trauma again. Our internal warriors have likely worked very hard at ensuring safety, at staving off overwhelming emotion, at maintain a safe distance between people, at scanning the environment for potential harm, or at helping keep things stable through numbing and avoidance. Sometimes these efforts can take a more extreme form, like dissociating from trauma, self-harm, excessive use of drugs or alcohol, suicidal fantasy. Many of these coping strategies are cause for concern, naturally, however there is generally some sort of positive intention behind them. Understanding the intention of the parts of self who are often trying to protect (Internal Warriors) and using them to guide safe trauma work is the goal of this workshop.

Participants must be actively engaged in individual therapy and must be able to interact with other group members in an emotionally safe way. Traumatic memories will not be discussed during the workshop, rather we will focus on how to prepare to do so in the context of individual psychotherapy.
Creativity, play and art will be utilized for the workshop and our hope is to have fun.

The workshop will be held July 18th from 1-4 pm. Cost is 125.00 and must be paid in full a week prior to reserve space. Maximum of 8 participants. Location TBA (either our Portland or Vancouver location depending upon number of participants). Call 971.266.6910 ext 301 for inquiries.

Intuition vs. Vigilance: A Survivor’s Superpower

Survivors often talk about their capacity to assess their environment with greater speed and accuracy than your average Joe (or Jane).  Scanning for emotional and physical safety through a heightened attunement to the behavior of others, their emotional states and placing themselves in a position that ensures the opportunity for immediate exit are sometimes habituated ways of being for survivors.  Safety is dependent upon the capacity to detect threat (even subtle ones) quickly and correctly and often times, scanning for threat is baseline for a trauma survivor; one doesn’t ever come to a place of complete resting; resting equals risk.

Clients talk about their capacity to assess other people and the safety of their environment as something they are both proud of and fairly attached to.  I am often given examples of how vigilance has protected them of injury by providing ample time for fight or flight.  This perspective makes sense to me from the standpoint of someone who has endured; it is reasonable to make every effort to avert further injury.  And, in all honesty, I am often impressed with the capacity and skill survivors have developed in the appraisal of subtle environmental cues that otherwise go unnoticed. People who have witnessed or experienced unbearable things sometimes talk about this capacity as heightened intuition~a sixth sense.

Arguably, vigilance is a departure of intuition; it kicks in when we no longer trust in ourselves to ensure invulnerability and when we no longer trust that the world is safe. Intuition happens without thought or awareness; it is automatic and requires no effort.  I like to think of vigilance as a natural resource; while it is abundant it is not finite.  Habituation of external evaluation and anticipation of response tires the body; we were not designed to be alert consistently.  Additionally, vigilance could be viewed as a departure from ourselves and our sense of agency.  We rely on superheroes and superpowers when we can no longer trust in our own capacity.

I encourage my clients to “save your fear for when you need it” and the rest of the time work towards reconnecting to self, trust in one’s resourcefulness, and to take the risk of resting.  This parallels my admiration for the ways in which the PTSD is adaptive and clearly an attempt at returning to an assumption of safety.  Counseling, massage therapy, reiki and acupuncture are the various attempts we are making at working towards a place of quiet; the juncture of rest and safety are the mini-moments that uncouple rest with risk and begin to teach the body that we can trust our intuition and give our vigilance a vacation.