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Art Workshop for Dissociative Identity Disorder

Art Therapy Workshop-2 in April.

We will use mixed media to provide a safe, fun, opportunity to map your internal family. The product will be adaptable and will be helpful in conversation treatment providers, friends and family. Attached is the flyer.

Contact Athena@traumacenternw.com for more info.

Multi-cultural Trauma Training in Rwanda!

Join us for a Trauma Training in Rwanda! Following our recent visit to Rwanda, ITTC has established a partnership with the Global Engagement Institute (GEI) and the University of Rwanda to provide a trauma training that is designed for international practitioners who want to build their skills in trauma treatment while learning with and from practitioners who are working to heal a population that has been exposed to significant trauma (this is a notably resilient population!).

The first training will be offered in June; we will select 15 international participants and 15 Rwandan participants; all must have degrees and be practicing mental health professionals.

There will be opportunity for exploring Rwanda, including seeing some animals (my favorite!).

Below is the link to GEI’s newsletter featuring the training and the flyer is also attached. Contact Athena Phillips @ athena@traumacenternw.com.

http://www.global-engagement.org/trauma-treatment-training-in-rwanda01/

The Recipe for Trauma Recovery; Rwanda and Resilience

Trauma happens on many social levels including very intimate violence, to car accidents, to terrorism, to genocide (and many other levels in between). Following the visit to the Kigali Genocide Memorial as well as talking with Rwandans about the recovery process, we have discovered many parallels in terms of how trauma manifests, when symptoms show up, and what kind of response is effective.

People in this country who survived the genocide have spent the last 20 years rebuilding their country as well as trust between people. The children who were orphaned have grown into adulthood and, while life is clearly not easy for many, there is movement beyond their horror and loss. Re-integration between survivors and perpetrators is occurring now and very strict laws are in place to eliminate racial division (which have been very effective by the way); these two things must occur together in order to prevent further violence. Rwanda has done an excellent job in the first phase of recovery from trauma. Naturally I cannot help but to compare.

Trauma therapists know that there is a certain recipe for recovery that is necessary to lift ourselves out of our past. Here is a general description:

1. Safety must be established first. Basic needs must be met.
2. Acknowledgement that the bad thing happened.
3. Validation that the bad thing was indeed bad and any kind of associated grief is appropriate.
4. An appropriate response must be offered. Responsibility must be appropriately assigned.
5. A plan for justice, reconciliation, forgiveness, letting go must be developed.

Generally if a trauma is acknowledged, that is the first necessary ingredient for moving towards trust (in others and in safety). Often in the United States, we get stuck here. It is very difficult for us to acknowledge the bad thing without blaming the survivor or denying it all together. Unfortunately a survivor of some sort event is often put on a timeline for recovery, is blamed for what happened to them, are not believed, and of course the other ingredients can only be added if the basics are addressed.

Rwanda has been able to do several things that has allowed the country to move towards healing. The first, as mentioned before is the acknowledgement that racial division is dangerous; it is not allowable to identify people based on ethnicity. One Rwanda One People. The second is responding appropriate by building community and helping people in concrete ways. There has been a significant effort to provide justice to survivors at a community level; survivors have a voice in that process and it is very intimate. As a result, Rwanda is now the safest country in Africa and has crime rates lower than the majority of states in the U.S. Citizens are required to give back to their community every month (it’s the law!). As a result, Rwanda is spotless; there is no trash anywhere! Rwanda’s economy is stable and strong and growing. There are laws supporting women~for example there must be a certain percentage of women in governing positions. Leveling the playing field between ethnic groups and gender has fostered a very stable and growing economy; one of the strongest in region.

Rwanda has figured out how to recover and thrive following a very recent and horrific tragedy in their country; we can all learn from what they have done.

Rwanda's recipe for recovery
Rwanda’s recipe for recovery

Rwanda Day 2: Compassionate Curiousity

Our first venture in Rwanda was the iconic safari trek. This allowed us to quietly wander through this new landscape while we appreciated its natural beauty and animal inhabitants.

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We came here to learn from and exchange information with the people in this resilient community…however, watching animals in their natural habitat set the stage for a sense of wonder, admiration and curiosity that we will most certainly take with us in our professional meetings this week.

Even the animal kingdom here is in a revival phase, since many animals were killed in the genocide along with their human neighbors. There are also stories of targeted assaults on specific species, such as the lions, due to the threat they posed to the local livestock. The backlash of farmers poisoning their own cows totally eradicated lions from this area. Just last summer, seven were “re-introduced” to the protected land in the national park we visited, a gift from South Africa, and existing relatively hidden to visitors as they roam the property. Imagine our awe and excitement when we happened to spot one and watch as it sunbathed some 30 yards from our vehicle!

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One chord that reverberated from our safari experience was the practice of being with other beings in a way that’s respectful of their unique experience — sensitive that it is VERY different from our own. We found ourselves naturally speaking in soothing, hushed tones to the animals, or simply sitting totally still and silent, in respect for their territory and existence. We asked basic questions of our guides, purposefully leaving behind our presuppositions and entering wholeheartedly into a world that’s very different from our own.

We held our curiosity with a sense of compassion, attempting to understand creatures we easily admitted were foreign, yet important in a way that’s difficult to articulate in words. This ability, this altruism, is something we will intentionally carry over into this coming week … A willingness to enter generously into another’s point of view with humble, compassionate curiosity.

Rwanda Day 1: Listening and Being Listened To; a Western Luxury

On the second leg of my flight to Rwanda, I sat next to a 25 year-old woman who was traveling from Luxembourg to Rwanda for her wedding. I asked what seemed to be a fairly innocuous question; “Why do you live in Luxembourg and why are you getting married in Rwanda versus your home?” She responded that because her parents were murdered in 1995 during the genocide she had been adopted by a family from Luxembourg, however her fiance resided in her home country. Oh. How do you continue a conversation after an acknowledgement of such horror? She talked about the fact that she cannot visit Rwanda during the month of April because 20 years later, she is still terrified (April is the month during which the genocide took place).

I stumbled through the conversation with as much sensitivity as I could; I didn’t want to ask to much or ask too little. I did tell her my intentions in visiting Rwanda, which are essentially to explore the possibility of providing some sort of specialized support to survivors of the genocide and their children. She told me she didn’t know how someone could recover from the kind of atrocity faced by this country, which prompted a brief conversation about parental attunement, listening, and being heard.

She noted the differences between her white adoptive parents and her Rwandan birth parents; one of which was they had luxury to tune into her needs, listen and be able to provide an appropriate response. In countries that struggle economically, the primary concern of the parent is to feed and house their children. Emotional support is last on the list.

Rwandans have recovered from the genocide remarkably and with a great deal of grace. I am not familiar enough with the culture to understand what is happening emotionally beneath the surface or how trauma has manifested here. I also don’t know how many have told their story and how many have had the opportunity to have someone listen or even if that would be useful. Perhaps there is something I can learn from this culture about alternative forms of healing and meanwhile, whenever a local tells me their story, I certainly plan to listen.